Skip to Main Content / Passer au contenu
 

Bénévoles en vedette

À Parlons sciences, notre engagement auprès de la jeunesse canadienne en apprentissage de la science, technologie, ingénierie et mathématiques (STIM) est largement supporté par plus de 3500 bénévoles à travers le pays.


Possédant des compétences de tous genres et issus d’un vaste éventail de parcours scolaires en STIM, les bénévoles de Parlons sciences contribuent de plusieurs manières – que ce soit en personne lors des événements de Parlons sciences et des activités de sensibilisation aux sciences, virtuellement par le biais de CurioCité, ou en s’impliquant auprès du conseil d’administration.

Poursuivez votre lecture pour découvrir une portion de nos bénévoles talentueux.

Prêts à vous lancer en tant que bénévole de Parlons sciences?

Découvrez comment vous pouvez vous impliquer Comment nos bénévoles ouvrent des portes sur des avenirs prometteurs

 


 

Shamisa Honarmand, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McGill University

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Shamisa HonarmandMentoring high school students is a rewarding experience for both the high school students and the post-secondary volunteers. Learn more about the many benefits of volunteering with Let’s Talk Science.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 1 year

Area of study: PhD candidate in the Human Genetics department at McGill University

Inspirational Moment: It was rewarding when I was able to mentor high school students, and to give feedback on their scientific project using the skills that I have acquired during my PhD.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Mentoring high school students. It was very interesting to see them passionate about working in a molecular biology laboratory for the first time.

 Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? It gives me good experience coaching and problem solving. Volunteering is also good for the community, which gives a natural sense of accomplishment.

 Fun fact: I love cooking, playing sports, and eating chocolate.

Mazen Saleh, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at Laurentian University

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Mazen SalehAs a faculty member at Laurentian, Mazen uses his knowledge and experience to inspire high school students during lab tours on campus.

See more about Laurentian’s Outreach program.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 5 years

Current Position: Associate Professor and Chair

Inspirational Moment: One moment was about 6 months ago at the local grocery store in the south end of Sudbury. I was approached by a student in Grade 11 who wanted to know more about viruses. She was very interested in viruses and how they cause disease. I spent a few minutes talking with her about viral diseases and I could see the excitement in her eyes as I explained some aspects of viral infections. That was very inspiring indeed.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Meeting with high school students during their visits to Laurentian and giving them a tour of my lab.

 Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I love to share my passion for science with future generations.

Fun fact: Viruses do not infect each other, but they can infect plants, animals, and even bacteria.

Rachel Hems, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer at University of Toronto

2017-03-24 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Rachel HemsRachel Hems, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer at University of Toronto

Rachel has increased her reach to youth by becoming a volunteer writer for CurioCity.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Three years

Area of study: Atmospheric Chemistry PhD

Inspirational Moment: I’ve run a few weekend activities at a local library and was inspired to see that lots of kids came out and were excited to learn science outside of the classroom.

Favourite CurioCity article: Thundersnow: Winter Thunderstorms

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Wonders of Weather

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Science outreach is so much fun! I enjoy sharing my passion and excitement for science as well as teaching students and adults how interesting science is, especially chemistry. Now, as a CurioCity volunteer, I enjoy exploring and writing about cool aspects of science that are shared online and can reach an even bigger audience.

 Fun fact: I’ve climbed the CN tower in Toronto twice. It’s 553 meters tall and has 1776 stairs!

Kofi Adasi, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer at University of Alberta

2017-03-23 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Kofi Adasi

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Three years

Position: INFORM/KUSP Trial Coordinator, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta

Inspirational Moment: Responding to insightful scientific questions from pupils/students.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Jurassic Park.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Knowledge sharing and motivating young people in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Learn more about Kofi’s career through CurioCity's Career Profiles

Michael Jensen, Professional Volunteer - Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer in Oshawa, ON

2017-03-13 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Michael JensenMichael started volunteering during his time at Western University in London, Ontario. After graduating, he continues to be an active professional volunteer with Let’s Talk Science.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Since October 2009

Position: Medical Physics Resident, Lakeridge Health

Inspirational Moment: On one school visit, there were some volunteers rotating through several classrooms with different activities. I was doing the activity where you extract DNA from a banana. The class finished before the end of the rotation, so I opened up the floor to any science questions. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. Well, the class had picked up on a few comments I had made during the activity about genetics, cloning in particular, and the questions were flying! I was quite amazed that mashing up some fruit would lead to an engaged and lively discussion about cloning with a class of junior elementary students.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Rube Goldberg Machine. It’s amazing to see the creativity and enthusiasm the students bring to the building of their contraptions.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? First and foremost, it’s fun and rewarding to share my passion for science. I enjoy facilitating the hands-on activities that present science in an exciting and engaging way. It allows me to reconnect with the awe and wonder that initially led me to pursue science. Secondly, it’s about service to the community; to bring science out of the lab, to make it accessible, and to provide the STEM opportunities for youth that they may not have otherwise.

Fun fact: I once volunteered for a Let’s Talk Science event aboard a (docked) ferry – the MS Chi-Cheemaun [in Owen Sound, ON].

Are you a past Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer who has graduated and would like continue you volunteer experience? Connect with our volunteer coordinator for professionals, Jenna Friedt at jfriedt@letstalkscience.ca for more information on how you can stay involved with Let’s Talk Science.

Stephanie Halmhofer, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer

2017-01-20 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Stephanie HalmhoferStephanie is a bioarchaelologist who volunteers with Let’s Talk Science to share her passion for her field as well as to help inspire young women.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 2 years

Current Position: Masters student at the University of Toronto and bioarchaeologist with In Situ Consulting

Learn more about Stephanie’s work in bioarchaeology on her CurioCity Career Profile!

Inspirational Moment: Being in a classroom for Career Day demonstrations on DNA and after, talking about how DNA can be used in archaeology. So many questions were asked that we almost ran out of time in all three sessions! It’s not easy to get a room full of young students talking, so it was very exciting to have so many students expressing their interests through their questions.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity:  I love writing small online articles for CurioCity. It’s such a great platform full of fun and interesting information on just about any subject you can think of, and it’s fantastic being able to contribute to that.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I think it’s a fantastic way to spread the word not only about how awesome science is, but that there are so many different types of science you can get involved in. I love being able to share my passion for my chosen field (bioarchaeology) and hope to show many people, especially young women, that science is worth being passionate about!

Fun fact: Think of your skeleton as a biography written about you – over your lifetime it records information about the places you’ve lived, the foods you’ve eaten, even the jobs you’ve had. A bioarchaeologist is an archaeologist with special training in understanding how to “read” a skeleton for all of this information, which we can use to reconstruct what life was like in the past!

Jennifer Morgan, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McMaster University

2016-12-07 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Jennifer MorganJennifer is helping to change youth attitudes about science. Through her volunteering, she is seeing the difference that she can make in the lives of students with chemistry and physics activities.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Since October 2015

Area of study: Chemistry PhD with a focus on silicone polymers

Inspirational Moment: The most inspirational moments are when the kids are having fun, particularly when they had insisted that they dislike science. Despite their initial attitude towards the activity, I think it is amazing that we are able to turn a subject that can be seen as ‘hard’ or ‘boring’ into fun activities which can change an entire room’s perspective, and have them begging to start the next activity.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity:  The chemistry and physics activities are my favourite; I really enjoyed doing ‘Lava Lamps’ and the ‘Coin Drop with a Twist’ with students.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I love working with children. It’s a great opportunity for me to share my knowledge while encouraging them to consider a future in science. I love seeing their faces light up with excitement and joy when they start to see and understand the science occurring in front of their eyes.

Fun fact: When I’m not ‘cooking’ up silicones in the lab, I’m baking desserts in the kitchen; my weekly lab group meetings are my excuse to bake. Chemist by day, ‘chemist’ by night.

Ryan Izyk, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at University of Calgary

2016-11-14 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Ryan IzykAs a student in the education department, Ryan is gaining some useful in-class experience as an Outreach volunteer. Visit our volunteer page to find out more benefits to volunteering with Let’s Talk Science.  

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 1 year

Area of study: Bachelor of Math & Education

Inspirational Moment: I was volunteering for the Let’s Talk Science Challenge last year, and the teacher and students with whom I am partnered with for the teacher partnership program were there with the rest of their school. The students were so excited to see me and show me off as “their volunteer” to the rest of their school. It was great seeing how engaged they were in the activities and feeling like I might have helped them to enjoy STEM topics more!

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Being part of the teacher partnership program [where a volunteer works with the same teacher and class throughout a school year] has been the most fun and rewarding experience with Let’s Talk Science so far. It’s great getting to know the teacher and students, and establishing relationships with them.   

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Volunteering with Let’s Talk Science is an excellent way for me to get valuable experience for my future teaching career. It is also a lot of fun interacting with students and showing them science is really interesting, so it’s a win-win all around!

‘Fun fact’: There are approximately 8*1068 ways to arrange a deck of cards, which is such an astronomically large number, it is almost certain that no 2 well shuffled deck of cards have ever been in the exact same arrangement!

Mira Okshevsky, Let’s Talk Science CurioCity Volunteer

2016-08-19 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

With online volunteering opportunities you can get involved with Let’s Talk Science from anywhere, even in Denmark! Learn how you can get started today volunteering for CurioCity.


Mira OkshevskyTime volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Since February 2016

Area of study: Interdisciplinary Nanoscience PhD candidate in the field of Microbiology, at the University of Aarhus in Denmark.

Learn more about Mira and her Research work on CurioCity through our Researcher Profiles!

Inspirational Moment: I was thrilled by the positive response I received for my “Cows vs Cars” articles, particularly from other scientists. The scientific community seems to agree that it is important to communicate science to the public, but finding the time to actually do it is a big challenge.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science article: Cows or Cars: Which one has the biggest impact on Climate Change?

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science?: I’m motivated by the goal of bridging the gap between the work scientists do in the lab, and people’s understanding of that work. It is important to be able to explain scientific concepts in a way that is understandable to everyone. Writing for CurioCity lets me practice my science communication skills, while hopefully showing young people that science is both important and accessible to them.

Fun fact - About me: Before I got hooked on microbiology, I studied graphic design at the Ontario College of Art and Design. Lots of roads can lead to science!

Fun Facts - About where I live:

  • The United Nations’ work happiness report consistently ranks Denmark as the happiest country on Earth. If you ask a Dane, they will probably tell you this is due to their “low expectations.”
  • The round pastry we call a “Danish” is called a “Viennese bread” in Denmark. Go figure.
  • LEGO is a Danish invention! The word is a contraction of the Danish words “lege godt,” which means “play well.”

Yousfi Nawres, Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer at Université de Moncton

2016-06-22 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Yousfi Nawres, Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer at Université de Moncton

At one of our newest Outreach locations, Université de Moncton, our volunteers are already hard at work (and play).

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Almost one week.

Area of study: Civil engineering

Inspirational Moment: At a Skills Canada event, a 91 year old man in a wheel chair asked to try our virtual reality videos. He really enjoyed the experience - it seemed to bring him back to childhood.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity:  Using games to do youth outreach.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I do a lot of volunteer work and really enjoy working with children. Through my volunteer work with Let’s Talk Science, I use my scientific knowledge and professional experiences to talk to youth about the importance of engineering, science and technology in an easy to understand and fun way. It is always a pleasure to impart knowledge to someone who will soon contribute to society.

Fun fact: I really love team work, exchanging ideas, communicating with others and understanding how kids learn.

Carlo Cilia, Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer at the University of Saskatchewan

2016-04-06 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Carlo started volunteering with Let’s Talk Science this year, and his efforts are already making an impact! If you are interested in volunteering with Let’s Talk Science, learn more about how you can get involved.


Carlo Cilia

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 4 months

Area of study: Master of Science in Geology, Focus on Environmental Geochemistry

Inspirational Moment: My first time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science, I was helping to give a presentation on ocean acidification and chemistry. Once we were finished the presentation and activities, the response from the students was unbelievable. They asked such incredibly out of the box and truly interesting questions. It was obvious to me that the students were engaged and absolutely interested in what we had discussed. Those are the moments that make outreach worth it. If you connect with even one student in a classroom, you feel that you have done your job. It made me feel so proud as a volunteer.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Helping create a scale Solar System in a gymnasium during our joint presentation with the Canadian Space Agency.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I’m absolutely obsessed with science, particularly Earth science, and I really enjoy interacting with other students and teaching them different concepts. I’ve always really enjoyed community outreach and I couldn’t think of a better way than through science! The idea that what I’m doing could inspire students to pursue careers in science is just phenomenal.

Fun fact: I have a twin sister!

Kelly Resmer, CurioCity Volunteer and Let’s Talk Science Outreach Alumna from Dalhousie University

2016-04-06 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Kelly has volunteered with a variety of Let’s Talk Science programs. At Let’s Talk Science, we like to stay connected with our volunteers and volunteer alumni. If you are a past Let’s Talk Science alum wanting to reconnect, contact Andre Motuzas.


Kelly Resmer

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 8 years, I started out volunteering with the Let’s Talk Science Outreach program activities. That no longer fit with my schedule so now I volunteer exclusively by writing articles for CurioCity.

Current Position: Chemistry lab instructor

Inspirational Moment: One of the first class visits I did was exploring optics of Jello, this was such an inspiring moment for me since the students were beginning to appreciate the science involved with everyday objects.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: The Let’s Talk Science Challenge, seeing the students compete was so exciting and such a pleasure to volunteer at. The trivia and engineering challenge was a lot of fun to help out with, the students participating blew me away with their knowledge and skill.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering article: My favourite (or perhaps most memorable) article was ‘Outbreak: The Ebola Virus’. I had just started to write this article at the beginning of the outbreak in 2014. It was devastating that as this article went through the editing process the Ebola crisis worsened and spread to such great numbers. It showed the importance of finding effective treatments and ways to control outbreaks.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Science outreach is so important! Hands-on minds-on science activities inspired me to pursue a career in chemistry, so I love giving back to the community to inspire the next generation of scientists. I continue to write articles for CurioCity since it’s essential to have a reliable place on the internet where people can go to for trustworthy science information at a level that is easy to understand

Heather E. McFarlane, Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer and Tomatosphere ™ volunteer

2016-04-06 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

After taking part in the Let’s Talk Science Outreach program in Canada, Heather continues to stay involved with Let’s Talk Science from Australia!


Heather E. McFarlane

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 10 years

Job Title: NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow & McKenzie Fellow, University of Melbourne (Australia)

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I joined Let’s Talk Science in 2006, just after I moved to Montreal to start my Masters of Science at McGill. It was a great way to meet people and to get to know different communities across the city. I’ve continued to work with Let’s Talk Science because I believe in communicating openly, informally, and often with the public about scientific concepts, especially evidence-based critical thinking and the necessity of continued funding for both research and education in science, technology, and health. Let’s Talk Science provides a platform for me to give back to my community and to the tax-payers who help to fund my research through government grants.

Inspirational Moment: I coordinated the Science Fair Mentorship program for several years in Vancouver and one of the UBC students who volunteered with the program had herself been mentored through the same program. It was great to see this kind of long-term effect.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Science fair mentorship has always been one of my favourite things to do because it builds long-term mentorship relationships with the students. Of course, I’m also a big fan of DNA extraction from bananas, since it’s all about molecular biology, plant science and making a mess.

Fun fact: I’ve lived on three continents in the last three years, and “football” has been a totally different sport in each place: NFL-type American football in Vancouver, soccer in Berlin, and Aussie-rules football (AFL) here in Melbourne.

Luc Denis, CurioCity volunteer

2016-04-06 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Luc is a volunteer for the online program CurioCity. To learn more about the program, visit explorecuriocity.org.


Luc Denis

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 1 year

Job title: Currently, I work as a junior environmental engineer and geographic information system (GIS) expert for an environmental consulting firm in Manitoba.

Favourite aspect of volunteering online with CurioCity: I like the fact that I can share my passion for science to young Francophones in Canada.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I volunteer with Let's Talk Science to share my passion for science.

Heidi Dixon, Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer at Memorial University, St. John's Campus

2016-04-06 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Heidi is one of our many volunteers who takes part in multi-day outreach trips to remote communities across Canada. Volunteers can be travelling for Let’s Talk Science anywhere from an afternoon to over a week! Providing equitable access is an important goal for all of Let’s Talk Science’s programs.


Heidi Dixon

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 5 years

Job title: Community Programs Developer

Inspirational Moment: I am currently on an outreach trip in Labrador, visiting Aboriginal communities. The response has been great during all sessions, but one in particular was the most inspirational so far. After doing a classroom session, one of the children came up and thanked me for my presentation. After giving me a high five, I asked if he would like to be a scientist some day- the enthusiastic yes I got made my day!

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: I love doing kits with younger kids- my favourite one is Matter Matters!

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I have always loved volunteering, when I heard about the program during my science studies at university, I knew it would be a perfect fit! Seeing the kids find the fun in science and becoming interested in it is always an exciting part of the experience.

Fun fact: When I'm not volunteering with Let's Talk Science, I'm working at the St. John's Native Friendship Centre as their community programs developer. I'm First Nations myself and I'm getting pretty good at traditional beading!

[12  >>