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Bénévoles en vedette

À Parlons sciences, notre engagement auprès de la jeunesse canadienne en apprentissage de la science, technologie, ingénierie et mathématiques (STIM) est largement supporté par plus de 3500 bénévoles à travers le pays.


Possédant des compétences de tous genres et issus d’un vaste éventail de parcours scolaires en STIM, les bénévoles de Parlons sciences contribuent de plusieurs manières – que ce soit en personne lors des événements de Parlons sciences et des activités de sensibilisation aux sciences, virtuellement par le biais de CurioCité, ou en s’impliquant auprès du conseil d’administration.

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Maria Boxwala, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer (University of Windsor Alumnus)

2017-07-12 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Maria is a volunteer alumnus from the University of Windsor that still stays engaged! If you are a Let’s Talk Science Outreach alumni, but want to continue volunteering, contact Lauren Hollis, Program Support Coordinator, Let’s Talk Science Outreach, to learn more or sign up.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 3 years

Area of study: Medical student at Saba University School of Medicine

Inspirational Moment: In the summer of 2016, I visited Glengarry homework club. We did activities for Messy Science Day which consisted of CO2 rockets, bike pump rockets, vortex cannon, build your own catapults, and elephant toothpaste. After we were done the kids had so much fun that they wanted us to return and do more activities with them. This positive experience was inspirational, and made me feel like I was making a difference.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: The vortex cannon is my favorite activity because it quickly engages a large group of students and kids.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I volunteer with Let’s Talk Science because I love working with children and getting them interested and passionate about science.

Fun fact: It is physically impossible for pigs to look up into the sky.

Krysta Levac, Let’s Talk Science CurioCity & Outreach Volunteer in London, ON

2017-06-26 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Krysta Levac

Krysta is a long-time volunteer who is helping students find excitement in the science classroom.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 6 years

Inspirational Moment: I visited the same Grade 3 classroom three times during the 2015-2016 school year. After the third workshop, one student was so excited to tell me that science had changed from her least favourite subject to her most favourite subject. It is inspiring to know that fun, hands-on activities can have such an amazing impact on children’s attitude toward science.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Since my background is human biology, my favourite Let’s Talk Science Outreach kit is “The Bone Zone”. It feeds kids’ fascination about how their bodies work and they love making the model hands. I’ve also really enjoyed writing articles for CurioCity.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I think science is the best tool we have for learning about our world and ourselves. I love sharing my enthusiasm for science with children and showing them how important – and fun! – science is.

Fun fact: I love fossils! I think it’s incredible that I can hold in my hands, the preserved form of animals that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. My favourite extinct animals are trilobites, a diverse group of arthropods that ruled the seas for over 200 million years.

Leena AlShenaiber, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McMaster University

2017-05-18 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Leena AlShenaiber

Not only does Leena do outreach activities through Let’s Talk Science, she also supports the program’s online presence to help spread the word about the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) activities.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Since December 2015

Area of study: Level II Integrated Science – Biology concentration (H.B.Sc)

Inspirational Moment: I run the social media platforms for Let’s Talk Science at McMaster, so seeing the incredible responses from individuals of all demographics is quite amazing and inspirational as it shows the widespread passion for science.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: I love volunteering at McMaster Children’s Hospital with Let’s Talk Science’s Community Outreach Program.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? To me, being exposed to and understanding different career paths and what they entail at a young age is very important. The STEM content Let’s Talk Science provides allows for a unique opportunity to achieve just that while allowing me to pursue my passion for science and teaching.

Fun fact: I also run the Let’s Talk Science Outreach website and the Let’s Talk Science McMaster website, and I absolutely love it!

Amanda Obodovsky (Papadimos), Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer in Calgary, AB

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Amanda Obodovsky Papadimos

Amanda hopes to inspire students to pursue a career in science. Explore some of the many careers that use science, technology, engineering and math on CurioCity.

 

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: About seven years

Position: Seismic Processor, Divestco

Inspirational Moment: I was in a Kindergarten class running an activity of my own invention called “Floaters and Sinkers” where I was dropping everyday household items into a tank of water and the kids were guessing what would sink and float. It was so amazing and inspiring to see five year olds get excited about science and learn the basics of density. 

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Meteor impacts! Dropping balls and marbles into a pan of flour to create impact craters is messy, but so much fun!

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I love to see others get excited and inspired by science. That look on their face when they learn something they think is really awesome is priceless. It is my hope that through my work others will go on to pursue a career in science.

Fun fact: While doing research for my Master’s degree, I discovered and named three main-belt asteroids. They are: 263251 Pandabear, 262536 Nowikow, and 254422 Henrykent.

Thomas McIntyre, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at University of Alberta

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Thomas McIntyreThomas has experienced the joy of seeing students succeed in science. You can join as a volunteer too! Visit our Volunteers page to see how to get involved.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: One year

Position: MRI Research Scientist, University of Alberta

Inspirational Moment: There are simply too many to list. One which stands out in my mind comes from volunteering on a Métis settlement. The community was so welcoming and the kids were happy to have an Outreach experience. The [students] laughed trying to find bugs, and loved trying to grow plants. I was happy watching them learn.

Another time was with Frontier College, where volunteering at their Summer Camp as a Science Counselor, I helped the kids learn about science in the real world. They especially loved the Elephants’ Toothpaste – GAK was also a favorite! Kids love to learn, and our hands-on Science really lets that shine!

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Electricity and Magnetism, with Elephants’ Toothpaste second and Alka Seltzer™ Rockets third.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I love seeing the joy in children’s eyes when they start doing science, and it works out. The laughter and excitement are bonuses too!

Fun fact: My favorite animals are the humpback whale, turtles and cats. My favorite color is red.

Billy Nicoll, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer in Cambridge Bay, NU

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Rachael HemsIn the northern territory of Nunavut, Billy provides a fun atmosphere that brings relevant science to life for students.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 2 years

Position: Residence Manager, Nunavut Arctic College

Inspirational Moment: Last year we held a weekend event at the Arctic College in Taloyoak, Nunavut involving a science show, activity stations and a big pot of caribou stew. The event itself was great, but the best part for me was the amazing number of kids who approached us while we were packing up - unprompted by parents or teachers - to directly thank us for the fun.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Can’t beat the Blubber Gloves activity (in which lard is used for insulation). [The activity is] very relevant to the north, and very funny for the kids.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? As a kid I was fortunate to have my Dad working at the University of Waterloo, meaning I was often participating in some sort of university open house, science camp or outreach trip. I’ve always found the combination of play, experimentation and learning at these events to be particularly exciting. I volunteer with Let’s Talk Science because it’s fun to see kids experience this same sort of excitement in my current home territory of Nunavut.

Fun fact: If you ever find yourself on the Arctic Ocean, look at the brightness of the clouds. If you are on a snowmobile (and don’t feel like swimming) beware dark clouds in the distance. On the other hand, if you are in a boat (and don’t feel like sinking) beware the bright ones. This is because of the differing reflectivity of ice and open water. The dark clouds - sometimes called “water sky” - indicate a large area of dark, open water beneath them. The bright clouds - or “ice blink” - indicate reflective ice glowing beneath them. This is a great trick and is still used in Arctic Ocean travel. That said, the clouds won’t tell you where the smaller ice or water patches are (or how thin the ice is either) so, you know, look down too...

Linda Jewell, Let’s Talk Science CurioCity and Outreach Volunteer

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Linda JewellLinda is a long-time Let’s Talk Science volunteer. As an Outreach volunteer, Site Coordinator, and CurioCity volunteer she has been inspiring youth for over a decade. Are you a Let’s Talk Science alumni who would like to get back in touch? Contact us today!

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 10 years

Current Position: Research Scientist (Plant Pathology), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Inspirational Moment: When I was at the University of Guelph, I presented activities at the Family Housing community centre on campus, where I also lived. After the first few activities, the kids in the neighbourhood would swarm me whenever they saw me around, asking me when we could “do science” together again. I was really moved by their excitement and genuine love of what I was doing.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: One day, I visited an elementary school in a small community outside of Ottawa. The school was so small that myself and one other team of volunteers were able to work with every single kid in the entire school in just a single day.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? When I was a kid, I had no idea what I wanted to do as an adult. I wish that I would have had more exposure to what a career in science could be, because I had no idea about the wide variety of jobs that use science every day. By volunteering with Let’s Talk Science, I hope that I can show kids that science isn’t intimidating; it’s exciting and fun, and it’s a major part of everything that we do. No matter what your hobby or passion might be, a solid understanding of science can only make you better.

 Fun fact: While I was a coordinator at the University of Guelph, I got to do an activity with Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Shamisa Honarmand, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McGill University

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Shamisa HonarmandMentoring high school students is a rewarding experience for both the high school students and the post-secondary volunteers. Learn more about the many benefits of volunteering with Let’s Talk Science.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 1 year

Area of study: PhD candidate in the Human Genetics department at McGill University

Inspirational Moment: It was rewarding when I was able to mentor high school students, and to give feedback on their scientific project using the skills that I have acquired during my PhD.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Mentoring high school students. It was very interesting to see them passionate about working in a molecular biology laboratory for the first time.

 Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? It gives me good experience coaching and problem solving. Volunteering is also good for the community, which gives a natural sense of accomplishment.

 Fun fact: I love cooking, playing sports, and eating chocolate.

Mazen Saleh, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at Laurentian University

2017-03-27 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Mazen SalehAs a faculty member at Laurentian, Mazen uses his knowledge and experience to inspire high school students during lab tours on campus.

See more about Laurentian’s Outreach program.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 5 years

Current Position: Associate Professor and Chair

Inspirational Moment: One moment was about 6 months ago at the local grocery store in the south end of Sudbury. I was approached by a student in Grade 11 who wanted to know more about viruses. She was very interested in viruses and how they cause disease. I spent a few minutes talking with her about viral diseases and I could see the excitement in her eyes as I explained some aspects of viral infections. That was very inspiring indeed.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Meeting with high school students during their visits to Laurentian and giving them a tour of my lab.

 Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I love to share my passion for science with future generations.

Fun fact: Viruses do not infect each other, but they can infect plants, animals, and even bacteria.

Rachel Hems, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer at University of Toronto

2017-03-24 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Rachel HemsRachel Hems, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer at University of Toronto

Rachel has increased her reach to youth by becoming a volunteer writer for CurioCity.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Three years

Area of study: Atmospheric Chemistry PhD

Inspirational Moment: I’ve run a few weekend activities at a local library and was inspired to see that lots of kids came out and were excited to learn science outside of the classroom.

Favourite CurioCity article: Thundersnow: Winter Thunderstorms

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Wonders of Weather

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Science outreach is so much fun! I enjoy sharing my passion and excitement for science as well as teaching students and adults how interesting science is, especially chemistry. Now, as a CurioCity volunteer, I enjoy exploring and writing about cool aspects of science that are shared online and can reach an even bigger audience.

 Fun fact: I’ve climbed the CN tower in Toronto twice. It’s 553 meters tall and has 1776 stairs!

Kofi Adasi, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer at University of Alberta

2017-03-23 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Kofi Adasi

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Three years

Position: INFORM/KUSP Trial Coordinator, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta

Inspirational Moment: Responding to insightful scientific questions from pupils/students.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Jurassic Park.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Knowledge sharing and motivating young people in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Learn more about Kofi’s career through CurioCity's Career Profiles

Michael Jensen, Professional Volunteer - Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer in Oshawa, ON

2017-03-13 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Michael JensenMichael started volunteering during his time at Western University in London, Ontario. After graduating, he continues to be an active professional volunteer with Let’s Talk Science.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Since October 2009

Position: Medical Physics Resident, Lakeridge Health

Inspirational Moment: On one school visit, there were some volunteers rotating through several classrooms with different activities. I was doing the activity where you extract DNA from a banana. The class finished before the end of the rotation, so I opened up the floor to any science questions. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect. Well, the class had picked up on a few comments I had made during the activity about genetics, cloning in particular, and the questions were flying! I was quite amazed that mashing up some fruit would lead to an engaged and lively discussion about cloning with a class of junior elementary students.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Rube Goldberg Machine. It’s amazing to see the creativity and enthusiasm the students bring to the building of their contraptions.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? First and foremost, it’s fun and rewarding to share my passion for science. I enjoy facilitating the hands-on activities that present science in an exciting and engaging way. It allows me to reconnect with the awe and wonder that initially led me to pursue science. Secondly, it’s about service to the community; to bring science out of the lab, to make it accessible, and to provide the STEM opportunities for youth that they may not have otherwise.

Fun fact: I once volunteered for a Let’s Talk Science event aboard a (docked) ferry – the MS Chi-Cheemaun [in Owen Sound, ON].

Are you a past Let’s Talk Science Outreach volunteer who has graduated and would like continue you volunteer experience? Connect with our volunteer coordinator for professionals, Jenna Friedt at jfriedt@letstalkscience.ca for more information on how you can stay involved with Let’s Talk Science.

Stephanie Halmhofer, Let’s Talk Science Outreach and CurioCity Volunteer

2017-01-20 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Stephanie HalmhoferStephanie is a bioarchaelologist who volunteers with Let’s Talk Science to share her passion for her field as well as to help inspire young women.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 2 years

Current Position: Masters student at the University of Toronto and bioarchaeologist with In Situ Consulting

Learn more about Stephanie’s work in bioarchaeology on her CurioCity Career Profile!

Inspirational Moment: Being in a classroom for Career Day demonstrations on DNA and after, talking about how DNA can be used in archaeology. So many questions were asked that we almost ran out of time in all three sessions! It’s not easy to get a room full of young students talking, so it was very exciting to have so many students expressing their interests through their questions.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity:  I love writing small online articles for CurioCity. It’s such a great platform full of fun and interesting information on just about any subject you can think of, and it’s fantastic being able to contribute to that.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I think it’s a fantastic way to spread the word not only about how awesome science is, but that there are so many different types of science you can get involved in. I love being able to share my passion for my chosen field (bioarchaeology) and hope to show many people, especially young women, that science is worth being passionate about!

Fun fact: Think of your skeleton as a biography written about you – over your lifetime it records information about the places you’ve lived, the foods you’ve eaten, even the jobs you’ve had. A bioarchaeologist is an archaeologist with special training in understanding how to “read” a skeleton for all of this information, which we can use to reconstruct what life was like in the past!

Jennifer Morgan, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at McMaster University

2016-12-07 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Jennifer MorganJennifer is helping to change youth attitudes about science. Through her volunteering, she is seeing the difference that she can make in the lives of students with chemistry and physics activities.

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: Since October 2015

Area of study: Chemistry PhD with a focus on silicone polymers

Inspirational Moment: The most inspirational moments are when the kids are having fun, particularly when they had insisted that they dislike science. Despite their initial attitude towards the activity, I think it is amazing that we are able to turn a subject that can be seen as ‘hard’ or ‘boring’ into fun activities which can change an entire room’s perspective, and have them begging to start the next activity.

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity:  The chemistry and physics activities are my favourite; I really enjoyed doing ‘Lava Lamps’ and the ‘Coin Drop with a Twist’ with students.

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? I love working with children. It’s a great opportunity for me to share my knowledge while encouraging them to consider a future in science. I love seeing their faces light up with excitement and joy when they start to see and understand the science occurring in front of their eyes.

Fun fact: When I’m not ‘cooking’ up silicones in the lab, I’m baking desserts in the kitchen; my weekly lab group meetings are my excuse to bake. Chemist by day, ‘chemist’ by night.

Ryan Izyk, Let’s Talk Science Outreach Volunteer at University of Calgary

2016-11-14 | Bénévoles en vedette, Featured Volunteers

Ryan IzykAs a student in the education department, Ryan is gaining some useful in-class experience as an Outreach volunteer. Visit our volunteer page to find out more benefits to volunteering with Let’s Talk Science.  

Time volunteering with Let’s Talk Science: 1 year

Area of study: Bachelor of Math & Education

Inspirational Moment: I was volunteering for the Let’s Talk Science Challenge last year, and the teacher and students with whom I am partnered with for the teacher partnership program were there with the rest of their school. The students were so excited to see me and show me off as “their volunteer” to the rest of their school. It was great seeing how engaged they were in the activities and feeling like I might have helped them to enjoy STEM topics more!

Favourite Let’s Talk Science volunteering activity: Being part of the teacher partnership program [where a volunteer works with the same teacher and class throughout a school year] has been the most fun and rewarding experience with Let’s Talk Science so far. It’s great getting to know the teacher and students, and establishing relationships with them.   

Why do you volunteer with Let’s Talk Science? Volunteering with Let’s Talk Science is an excellent way for me to get valuable experience for my future teaching career. It is also a lot of fun interacting with students and showing them science is really interesting, so it’s a win-win all around!

‘Fun fact’: There are approximately 8*1068 ways to arrange a deck of cards, which is such an astronomically large number, it is almost certain that no 2 well shuffled deck of cards have ever been in the exact same arrangement!

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