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Lesson 3: Design

Activities Timing Student grouping Description
Minds-On: Game review and set-up 10-15 minutes Small group

Students watch a video of the Moon’s surface and set up the game.

Action: Play! 30 minutes Small group Working in teams, students play the game and document their mission. After multiple iterations of the game, they choose their best mission.
Consolidation: Mission comparison 10-15 minutes Independent and Large group Students complete an Exit Ticket and share their best mission with the class.

Students will:

  • Work and collaborate as a team
  • Understand how to determine the success of a mission by weighing its risks and benefits
  • Complete two or more missions of the Lunar Rover Mission Game

Learning Goals

Students will:

  • Work and collaborate as a team
  • Understand how to determine the success of a mission by weighing its risks and benefits
  • Complete two or more missions of the Lunar Rover Mission Game

Students can:

  • Contribute to their team by fulfilling the responsibilities of their role in the game
  • Use critical thinking skills to determine what worked well and what could be improved in each mission
  • Compare and contrast two or more missions and explain which mission they think is the most successful

Success Criteria

Students can:

  • Contribute to their team by fulfilling the responsibilities of their role in the game
  • Use critical thinking skills to determine what worked well and what could be improved in each mission
  • Compare and contrast two or more missions and explain which mission they think is the most successful
Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations: 

  • Observe and document student understanding of the risks and benefits of lunar exploration as they discuss their choices throughout the game (Action).
  • Observe and document collaboration and teamwork skills while students play the Lunar Rover Mission Game (Action).

Products:

  • Mission Summaries could be submitted as an assessment of learning for those not entering the competition (Action).
  • The Exit Ticket could be used as an assessment for learning (Consolidation).

Evidence of Student Learning

Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations: 

  • Observe and document student understanding of the risks and benefits of lunar exploration as they discuss their choices throughout the game (Action).
  • Observe and document collaboration and teamwork skills while students play the Lunar Rover Mission Game (Action).

Products:

  • Mission Summaries could be submitted as an assessment of learning for those not entering the competition (Action).
  • The Exit Ticket could be used as an assessment for learning (Consolidation).

Students will:

  • Work and collaborate as a team
  • Understand how to determine the success of a mission by weighing its risks and benefits
  • Complete two or more missions of the Lunar Rover Mission Game

Learning Goals

Students will:

  • Work and collaborate as a team
  • Understand how to determine the success of a mission by weighing its risks and benefits
  • Complete two or more missions of the Lunar Rover Mission Game

Students can:

  • Contribute to their team by fulfilling the responsibilities of their role in the game
  • Use critical thinking skills to determine what worked well and what could be improved in each mission
  • Compare and contrast two or more missions and explain which mission they think is the most successful

Success Criteria

Students can:

  • Contribute to their team by fulfilling the responsibilities of their role in the game
  • Use critical thinking skills to determine what worked well and what could be improved in each mission
  • Compare and contrast two or more missions and explain which mission they think is the most successful
Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations: 

  • Observe and document student understanding of the risks and benefits of lunar exploration as they discuss their choices throughout the game (Action).
  • Observe and document collaboration and teamwork skills while students play the Lunar Rover Mission Game (Action).

Products:

  • Mission Summaries could be submitted as an assessment of learning for those not entering the competition (Action).
  • The Exit Ticket could be used as an assessment for learning (Consolidation).

Evidence of Student Learning

Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations: 

  • Observe and document student understanding of the risks and benefits of lunar exploration as they discuss their choices throughout the game (Action).
  • Observe and document collaboration and teamwork skills while students play the Lunar Rover Mission Game (Action).

Products:

  • Mission Summaries could be submitted as an assessment of learning for those not entering the competition (Action).
  • The Exit Ticket could be used as an assessment for learning (Consolidation).
Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
  • Recording tools (e.g., pencils, erasers, pens, coloured pencil crayons), if doing the print version of the game.
  • Device with a keyboard and internet access, if doing the online version of the game.
  • Mission Comparison Exit Ticket reproducible [Google Form] [Word doc] [PDF]
1 per student
1 per group

 

For teacher use

 

Materials

Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
  • Recording tools (e.g., pencils, erasers, pens, coloured pencil crayons), if doing the print version of the game.
  • Device with a keyboard and internet access, if doing the online version of the game.
  • Mission Comparison Exit Ticket reproducible [Google Form] [Word doc] [PDF]
1 per student
1 per group

 

For teacher use

 

  • Decide if you want students to use the condensed or the competition version of the game. See the Project Guide for a comparison chart of the condensed and competition experiences.

* The condensed version of the game is designed for students to play a few shortened missions within one class period. The competition version of the game will require more time for teams to complete several full-length missions to compare. 

You can make this decision based on time availability in your programming, the abilities of your students, and how comfortable they feel with gameplay after watching and participating in the How to Play video. You may bypass the condensed version and fast-track your students to play the full-length competition version of the game. 

  • If students are playing the competition version of the game, it is important that they keep all the materials from each game iteration. They will use these to complete the submission template in Lesson 4.

Preparation

  • Decide if you want students to use the condensed or the competition version of the game. See the Project Guide for a comparison chart of the condensed and competition experiences.

* The condensed version of the game is designed for students to play a few shortened missions within one class period. The competition version of the game will require more time for teams to complete several full-length missions to compare. 

You can make this decision based on time availability in your programming, the abilities of your students, and how comfortable they feel with gameplay after watching and participating in the How to Play video. You may bypass the condensed version and fast-track your students to play the full-length competition version of the game. 

  • If students are playing the competition version of the game, it is important that they keep all the materials from each game iteration. They will use these to complete the submission template in Lesson 4.
  • Familiarity with collaborative group work.  Remind students to listen to one another, respect the opinions of other group members, and contribute equally.
  • Completion of Lesson 2 to understand how to play the game as a team.
  • Able to record data in a table.
  • Able to create a graph using a data table.
  • Some familiarity with how to play map-based board games is an asset.

Digital Game Format:

  • Able to navigate and edit Google Slides in a shared file.

Student Prior Knowledge and Skills

  • Familiarity with collaborative group work.  Remind students to listen to one another, respect the opinions of other group members, and contribute equally.
  • Completion of Lesson 2 to understand how to play the game as a team.
  • Able to record data in a table.
  • Able to create a graph using a data table.
  • Some familiarity with how to play map-based board games is an asset.

Digital Game Format:

  • Able to navigate and edit Google Slides in a shared file.
Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
  • Recording tools (e.g., pencils, erasers, pens, coloured pencil crayons), if doing the print version of the game.
  • Device with a keyboard and internet access, if doing the online version of the game.
  • Mission Comparison Exit Ticket reproducible [Google Form] [Word doc] [PDF]
1 per student
1 per group

 

For teacher use

 

Materials

Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
  • Recording tools (e.g., pencils, erasers, pens, coloured pencil crayons), if doing the print version of the game.
  • Device with a keyboard and internet access, if doing the online version of the game.
  • Mission Comparison Exit Ticket reproducible [Google Form] [Word doc] [PDF]
1 per student
1 per group

 

For teacher use

 

  • Decide if you want students to use the condensed or the competition version of the game. See the Project Guide for a comparison chart of the condensed and competition experiences.

* The condensed version of the game is designed for students to play a few shortened missions within one class period. The competition version of the game will require more time for teams to complete several full-length missions to compare. 

You can make this decision based on time availability in your programming, the abilities of your students, and how comfortable they feel with gameplay after watching and participating in the How to Play video. You may bypass the condensed version and fast-track your students to play the full-length competition version of the game. 

  • If students are playing the competition version of the game, it is important that they keep all the materials from each game iteration. They will use these to complete the submission template in Lesson 4.

Preparation

  • Decide if you want students to use the condensed or the competition version of the game. See the Project Guide for a comparison chart of the condensed and competition experiences.

* The condensed version of the game is designed for students to play a few shortened missions within one class period. The competition version of the game will require more time for teams to complete several full-length missions to compare. 

You can make this decision based on time availability in your programming, the abilities of your students, and how comfortable they feel with gameplay after watching and participating in the How to Play video. You may bypass the condensed version and fast-track your students to play the full-length competition version of the game. 

  • If students are playing the competition version of the game, it is important that they keep all the materials from each game iteration. They will use these to complete the submission template in Lesson 4.
  • Familiarity with collaborative group work.  Remind students to listen to one another, respect the opinions of other group members, and contribute equally.
  • Completion of Lesson 2 to understand how to play the game as a team.
  • Able to record data in a table.
  • Able to create a graph using a data table.
  • Some familiarity with how to play map-based board games is an asset.

Digital Game Format:

  • Able to navigate and edit Google Slides in a shared file.

Student Prior Knowledge and Skills

  • Familiarity with collaborative group work.  Remind students to listen to one another, respect the opinions of other group members, and contribute equally.
  • Completion of Lesson 2 to understand how to play the game as a team.
  • Able to record data in a table.
  • Able to create a graph using a data table.
  • Some familiarity with how to play map-based board games is an asset.

Digital Game Format:

  • Able to navigate and edit Google Slides in a shared file.

Minds-On: What does the surface of the moon look like? (10-15 min.)

Instructions Teaching Tips

As a class, watch a few minutes of this video of a Lunar rover vehicle on Moon from 1969. This will help them get an idea of what it would be like to actually explore the surface of the moon.

Refer to the Rover Infographic reproducible [html] [PDF] from Lesson 2. This will allow students to compare the lunar rover vehicle in the video to the lunar rover in this project.

Line drawing of speech bubbles

Discussions

Discussion prompts may include:

  • “What do you notice about the surface of the moon?”
  • “Do you think this is a lunar rover? Why or why not?”
  • “What is the main difference between this vehicle and the one from our project?”
  • “Is this rover in the dark or light area of the moon?”

Before playing the game, ask students to restate the mission goal. They should say something like, “Take the measurements to collect the most science points, while exposing the rover to the least amount of risk.”

Next, have teams set out their game components, ensuring that all of the game pieces are present. Assist students in replacing any missing game pieces.

line drawing of a lightbulb

Idea

If students wish, re-watch the How to Play video as a class.

Student(s) who were away for Lesson 2 will need to join a group and watch the How to Play video.

Have each team look at the map and discuss where they think the rover should travel during the mission. While doing this, encourage students to think about what makes a good mission.

line drawing of a lightbulb

Idea

Post a teamwork infographic with some suggestions of good practices when working on a team. If you notice teams struggling, encourage them to use these strategies to help them work together.

 

Action: Play! (30 min.)

Instructions Teaching Tips

Students play the game once. See the Lunar Rover Mission Rules for full details.

Important note for teams using competition version: 

If the mission is not going the way students thought it would, or they have made a major error, students cannot backtrack, erase or undo part of the game. Backtracking will complicate record keeping. Students may choose to abandon the mission and start a new game.

After the first playthrough, each team will summarize the details of their mission on the Mission Summary sheets. This is slide nine of the Game Set.

Mission Summary card from the Lunar Rover Challenge Condensed Game Set
Slide 9 of Condensed Game Set reproducible (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a slide with empty boxes for risk points, science points, notes about strengths, weaknesses and opportunities, and the viability of the mission.

Students will begin to understand the factors that make a good mission. They do this by thinking critically about their route and making decisions about locations to take measurements.

Each team will play the game a second time, using what they learned during their first mission. After the second mission, teams complete a second Mission Summary.

Have students compare the Mission Summary sheets from each game, as a group, then select the most successful mission to share with the class.

Assessment opporunties icon

While students play the game the second time, teachers can use the Student Gameplay Assessment Checkbric reproducible to assess student understanding of:

  • the risks and benefits of choices made during the mission
  • collaborative work skills
Line drawing of speech bubbles

Discussions

Suggested questions to ask teams that seem to be stuck in the game:

  1. Tell me about the instruments you chose.
  2. Tell me about the route you chose.
  3. How did you decide where to go and how to get there?

Answers may include: close to home, wanted to get the most science points, wanted to avoid risk along route, and chose the shorter path.

line drawing of a lightbulb

Idea

If some teams have only developed one viable mission, have them pair up with another team to compare their missions.

Consolidation: Mission Comparison (10-15 min.)

Instructions Teaching Tips

Clean up game pieces if using the printed version.

If students are not continuing on to complete a Competition Submission (Lesson 4), the following options can be used for assessment:

Assessment opporunties icon
  1. Students complete an Exit Ticket to compare their two missions.
  2. Teams present their best mission to the class, including its strengths and weaknesses. After each group has presented, ask the class to consider the following questions:
    1. Looking at the maps for each mission, what are some differences and similarities between the different routes?
    2. Did every group pick the same two instruments? Why or why not?
    3. Considering the risk and science points for each mission, is there an obvious best mission? Why or why not?

Note: Lesson 4 is entirely dedicated to the competition submission. Skip straight to Lesson 5 if students did not complete the competition version of the game.

 

line drawing of a lightbulb

Idea

Gauge student interest in making a competition submission. If some students really enjoyed the activity, but you don’t have time to do the Competition Submission and Lesson 4 as a class, suggest that they can continue outside of class time.

 

Reproducibles

Reproducibles and Media

Reproducibles

Science

  • Students could do further research about rovers and the people who build them.

Extensions

Science

  • Students could do further research about rovers and the people who build them.

Would you live on the moon? - Alex Gendler (2018)
This TED-ED video explores the challenges and benefits of building a lunar colony. Is living on the moon possible? How would we survive?

Objective Moon (Activities and Resources)
This is a collection of Moon themed Youth and Educator resources and activities from the Canadian Space Agency. The curriculum based resources also includes funding opportunities, photos and videos.

Drive a Space rover (2022)
Explore Mars: A Mars Rover Game is provided by NASA Science Space Place. The game is played by sending a sequence of commands to the Mars rover to collect data during its 8 expeditions. The voice of the game is Charlene Valerio, a NASA/JPL engineer who worked on the real Mars 2020 mission.

What If You Spend Just 30 Seconds on the Moon Without a Spacesuit? (2020)
This video from Riddle explores the extreme environment of the lunar surface, from the lack of air pressure to radiation exposure, how long can a human survive?

Learn More

Would you live on the moon? - Alex Gendler (2018)
This TED-ED video explores the challenges and benefits of building a lunar colony. Is living on the moon possible? How would we survive?

Objective Moon (Activities and Resources)
This is a collection of Moon themed Youth and Educator resources and activities from the Canadian Space Agency. The curriculum based resources also includes funding opportunities, photos and videos.

Drive a Space rover (2022)
Explore Mars: A Mars Rover Game is provided by NASA Science Space Place. The game is played by sending a sequence of commands to the Mars rover to collect data during its 8 expeditions. The voice of the game is Charlene Valerio, a NASA/JPL engineer who worked on the real Mars 2020 mission.

What If You Spend Just 30 Seconds on the Moon Without a Spacesuit? (2020)
This video from Riddle explores the extreme environment of the lunar surface, from the lack of air pressure to radiation exposure, how long can a human survive?

Reproducibles

Reproducibles and Media

Reproducibles

Science

  • Students could do further research about rovers and the people who build them.

Extensions

Science

  • Students could do further research about rovers and the people who build them.

Would you live on the moon? - Alex Gendler (2018)
This TED-ED video explores the challenges and benefits of building a lunar colony. Is living on the moon possible? How would we survive?

Objective Moon (Activities and Resources)
This is a collection of Moon themed Youth and Educator resources and activities from the Canadian Space Agency. The curriculum based resources also includes funding opportunities, photos and videos.

Drive a Space rover (2022)
Explore Mars: A Mars Rover Game is provided by NASA Science Space Place. The game is played by sending a sequence of commands to the Mars rover to collect data during its 8 expeditions. The voice of the game is Charlene Valerio, a NASA/JPL engineer who worked on the real Mars 2020 mission.

What If You Spend Just 30 Seconds on the Moon Without a Spacesuit? (2020)
This video from Riddle explores the extreme environment of the lunar surface, from the lack of air pressure to radiation exposure, how long can a human survive?

Learn More

Would you live on the moon? - Alex Gendler (2018)
This TED-ED video explores the challenges and benefits of building a lunar colony. Is living on the moon possible? How would we survive?

Objective Moon (Activities and Resources)
This is a collection of Moon themed Youth and Educator resources and activities from the Canadian Space Agency. The curriculum based resources also includes funding opportunities, photos and videos.

Drive a Space rover (2022)
Explore Mars: A Mars Rover Game is provided by NASA Science Space Place. The game is played by sending a sequence of commands to the Mars rover to collect data during its 8 expeditions. The voice of the game is Charlene Valerio, a NASA/JPL engineer who worked on the real Mars 2020 mission.

What If You Spend Just 30 Seconds on the Moon Without a Spacesuit? (2020)
This video from Riddle explores the extreme environment of the lunar surface, from the lack of air pressure to radiation exposure, how long can a human survive?