Educational Resources Lets Talk Science Challenge participants

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Anticipation Guide

What Is It?

This is an individual strategy in which students are presented with a list of statements that are related to the topic(s) presented in a text/video that will be read or viewed. While some of the statements may be clearly true or false, a good anticipation guide includes statements that provoke disagreement and challenge students’ beliefs about the topic.

Why use it?

  • To access and activate prior knowledge of the topic of a piece of written text or video
  • To introduce a new topic from reading an article on the topic or viewing a video
  • To build a student’s personal interest in the subject he/she will be reading about or seeing
  • To establish a purpose for reading text/viewing a video (students read to gather information that will either confirm or dispute their initial beliefs and cause them to rethink their beliefs)
  • To develop critical-thinking skills

Tips for success

  • This strategy can work well with expository texts and/or videos that present ideas that may be controversial to the reader.
  • Write a series of statements that focus on the information in the text/video footage that you want your students to focus on. Effective statements:
  • Allow students to answer initially without having read the text or viewed the video.
  • Can be clearly supported or refuted by information in the text or video.
  • Challenge student’s beliefs and current level of understanding.
  • Are general rather that specific.

How do I use it?

  • Create questions for the Anticipation Guide based on a given article or video, or use one of the Ready-to-Use Anticipation Guides created for Let's Talk Science content (see right).
Anticipation Guide Reproducible Template
Anticipation Guide Reproducible Template
  • Provide students with an Anticipation Guide at the beginning of the class.
  • Students complete the first part of the Anticipation Guide activity before they read the selected article or view the selected video.
  • Students answer answer the questions by marking a true or false (T/F) in the Before column of the Anticipation Guide.
  • Once students have answered the questions, they they read the article or view the video.
  • After reading or viewing , students mark true or false (T/F) in the After column of the Anticipation Guide.
  • Students find and write evidence from the article or video that supports their thinking, using the space below each statement.
  • Once completed these Anticipation Guides can be used in a variety of ways:
  • Handed in to the teacher to provide a formative assessment prior to starting studies about the topic featured in the article or video.
  • Students pair up and share their responses with their partner and discuss their responses.
  • Have a class discussion on the responses and the information presented in the article or video.

Variations

  • Model how to fill out an Anticipation Guide and find evidence in a text or video by completing an Anticipation Guide on an overhead or white board with the class.
  • Have students develop their own Anticipation Guide questions based on a reading or video. These student-developed Anticipation Guides can be shared with other students.

Extensions

  • Have students do additional external research to support or refute the claims and information in the article or video.

Using this Strategy

Create Your Own

Anticipation Guide Reproducible Template [Google doc] [PDF]

Create Your Own

Anticipation Guide Reproducible Template [Google doc] [PDF]

Ready To Use

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - Eye vs. Camera [Google doc] [PDF]  Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - Pollinators [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - Should We Eat Bugs? [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - The Ins and Outs of the Rocky Planets [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - The Newest Elements on the Periodic Table [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Ready To Use

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - Eye vs. Camera [Google doc] [PDF]  Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - Pollinators [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - Should We Eat Bugs? [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - The Ins and Outs of the Rocky Planets [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

Anticipation Guide-Reproducible - The Newest Elements on the Periodic Table [Google doc] [PDF] Answer Key [Google doc] [PDF]

References

Allen, J. (2004). Tools for teaching content literacy. Stenhouse Publishers.

Toronto District School Board. (2004). Instructional strategies for making connections in science (grades 9-12). Toronto District School Board.