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Up, Up and Away: Careers in Flight

Airport terminal with airplane

Airport terminal with airplane (Artis777, iStockphoto)

Airport terminal with airplane

Airport terminal with airplane (Artis777, iStockphoto)

Format
Subjects
Let's Talk Science
6

How does this align with my curriculum?

Students will learn about the wide variety of jobs related to the aviation industry.

Overview

Activities Timing Student Grouping Description
Minds-On: Who works in the aviation industry? 10-15 minutes Large group Students will brainstorm and share the range of jobs in the aviation industry they are familiar with.
Action: Playing with Flight Jobs 20-30 minutes Small group Students learn about the required skills, working conditions and required education of a variety of aviation careers through playing a game using “trading cards”.
Consolidation: Reflection 10-15 minutes Individual and Large group Students will reflect on their new knowledge, and pose new questions, about jobs related to flight

This lesson can be done over a few days.

Students will:

  • Learn about the variety of jobs related to flight
  • Communicate about careers in flight using subject-specific vocabulary
  • Learn the contributions of people from across Canada to the aviation industry

Learning Goals

Students will:

  • Learn about the variety of jobs related to flight
  • Communicate about careers in flight using subject-specific vocabulary
  • Learn the contributions of people from across Canada to the aviation industry

Students can:

  • Describe practical applications of flight in various occupations, including skilled trades using appropriate vocabulary
  • Name and describe at least two flight-related jobs
  • Identify reasons why aviation is important

Success Criteria

Students can:

  • Describe practical applications of flight in various occupations, including skilled trades using appropriate vocabulary
  • Name and describe at least two flight-related jobs
  • Identify reasons why aviation is important
Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations

  • Listen to and record anecdotally student contributions to the list of jobs by category (Minds-On).
  • Listen to and record anecdotally students' use of appropriate vocabulary as they do all of the activities (Minds-on, Action, Consolidation).

Conversations

  • Have conversations with students about the diversity of careers in the aviation industry (Consolidation).

Products

  • Review students’ responses to the questions on the Jobs in Flight 3-3-3 reproducible (Consolidation).

Evidence of Student Learning

Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations

  • Listen to and record anecdotally student contributions to the list of jobs by category (Minds-On).
  • Listen to and record anecdotally students' use of appropriate vocabulary as they do all of the activities (Minds-on, Action, Consolidation).

Conversations

  • Have conversations with students about the diversity of careers in the aviation industry (Consolidation).

Products

  • Review students’ responses to the questions on the Jobs in Flight 3-3-3 reproducible (Consolidation).

Students will:

  • Learn about the variety of jobs related to flight
  • Communicate about careers in flight using subject-specific vocabulary
  • Learn the contributions of people from across Canada to the aviation industry

Learning Goals

Students will:

  • Learn about the variety of jobs related to flight
  • Communicate about careers in flight using subject-specific vocabulary
  • Learn the contributions of people from across Canada to the aviation industry

Students can:

  • Describe practical applications of flight in various occupations, including skilled trades using appropriate vocabulary
  • Name and describe at least two flight-related jobs
  • Identify reasons why aviation is important

Success Criteria

Students can:

  • Describe practical applications of flight in various occupations, including skilled trades using appropriate vocabulary
  • Name and describe at least two flight-related jobs
  • Identify reasons why aviation is important
Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations

  • Listen to and record anecdotally student contributions to the list of jobs by category (Minds-On).
  • Listen to and record anecdotally students' use of appropriate vocabulary as they do all of the activities (Minds-on, Action, Consolidation).

Conversations

  • Have conversations with students about the diversity of careers in the aviation industry (Consolidation).

Products

  • Review students’ responses to the questions on the Jobs in Flight 3-3-3 reproducible (Consolidation).

Evidence of Student Learning

Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities.

Observations

  • Listen to and record anecdotally student contributions to the list of jobs by category (Minds-On).
  • Listen to and record anecdotally students' use of appropriate vocabulary as they do all of the activities (Minds-on, Action, Consolidation).

Conversations

  • Have conversations with students about the diversity of careers in the aviation industry (Consolidation).

Products

  • Review students’ responses to the questions on the Jobs in Flight 3-3-3 reproducible (Consolidation).

 

Materials and Preparation 

Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
1 per student
1 per group
  • Internet-enabled device with projector
  • Chart paper and marker or whiteboard/blackboard
For teacher use

 

Materials

Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
1 per student
1 per group
  • Internet-enabled device with projector
  • Chart paper and marker or whiteboard/blackboard
For teacher use

 

  • Set up a computer and projection device.

Print one set of the Career Trading Cards: Aviation Series reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF] per group.

Each card will need to be cut out, folded in half (image side out) and glued or taped to form a double-sided card.

Laminate the cards if possible.

""
Diagram for cutting and folding cards (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).

 

Preparation

  • Set up a computer and projection device.

Print one set of the Career Trading Cards: Aviation Series reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF] per group.

Each card will need to be cut out, folded in half (image side out) and glued or taped to form a double-sided card.

Laminate the cards if possible.

""
Diagram for cutting and folding cards (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).

 

  • Some familiarity with aircraft and aviation is an asset, but not required

Student Prior Knowledge and Skills

  • Some familiarity with aircraft and aviation is an asset, but not required
Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
1 per student
1 per group
  • Internet-enabled device with projector
  • Chart paper and marker or whiteboard/blackboard
For teacher use

 

Materials

Material/Technology/Setting Quantity
1 per student
1 per group
  • Internet-enabled device with projector
  • Chart paper and marker or whiteboard/blackboard
For teacher use

 

  • Set up a computer and projection device.

Print one set of the Career Trading Cards: Aviation Series reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF] per group.

Each card will need to be cut out, folded in half (image side out) and glued or taped to form a double-sided card.

Laminate the cards if possible.

""
Diagram for cutting and folding cards (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).

 

Preparation

  • Set up a computer and projection device.

Print one set of the Career Trading Cards: Aviation Series reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF] per group.

Each card will need to be cut out, folded in half (image side out) and glued or taped to form a double-sided card.

Laminate the cards if possible.

""
Diagram for cutting and folding cards (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).

 

  • Some familiarity with aircraft and aviation is an asset, but not required

Student Prior Knowledge and Skills

  • Some familiarity with aircraft and aviation is an asset, but not required

 

Teaching and Learning Activities 

Assessment opporunties icon

This icon indicates potential assessment opportunities

Minds-On: Who works in the aviation industry? (10-15 min.)

Instructions Teaching Tips

Using a brainstorming strategy, such as Crazy8s, have students think of all the reasons people use aircraft. Responses can include:

  • Moving people
  • Moving things
  • Helping people (e.g., search and rescue)
  • Fighting fires
  • Getting people to the hospital

Prompt students if they can only think of one or two of these categories.

 

Next, have students brainstorm careers/jobs of people that work with and on aircraft. We say that these people work in the aviation industry.

Explain to students that there are three main branches of the aviation industry:

  1. Commercial (flight used to make money by carrying people or cargo e.g., airlines)
  2. General (flight used for non-profit and non-military e.g., private pilots)
  3. Military (i.e., flight used by the Canadian Armed Forces)

Some jobs are only needed in some branches (e.g., fighter jet pilot), whereas others exist in all (e.g., aviation mechanics).

Record student responses on a board, chart paper or digital projection that students can see.

If students find this task challenging, you could provide some category prompts such as people who:

  • Design aircraft
  • Build aircraft
  • Fly aircraft
  • Fix aircraft
  • Help passengers on aircraft
  • Help direct aircraft to their destinations

These prompts could be written on a board or chart paper for reference.

Line drawing of a chalkboard with "abc" written on it

Language

Begin a word wall of terminology used in this lesson such as aircraft, aviation, baggage, cargo, passengers, etc. Continue to add to the wall during the lesson.

Assessment opporunties icon

Have a discussion with students about how they know of these jobs. Encourage them to share personal connections if they have them, such as going on family trips, going to an airshow or driving by an airport. Students also may have seen people working in these jobs on TV (e.g., Super Wings, the Aviators), in movies (e.g., Disney Planes, Disney Planes Fire & Rescue) or in books.

Line drawing of two gears next to each other

Community Connections

Discussion prompts can include:

  • “Where did you learn about the job you shared?“
  • “Do you know someone who has a job working with aircraft? What do they do?”
  • "What kinds of aircraft have you seen in the community? Where do you think they land? Where do you think they get fixed?"
  • “Have you been on an aircraft?” “What people did you see working in and around it?”

Let students know that there are even MORE jobs in the aviation industry than they listed.

It takes many different people to design aircraft, test aircraft, fly aircraft and keep aircraft working properly as well as all of the people who work with passengers on aircraft and the stuff (cargo and baggage) that is carried on aircraft.

While people tend to be most familiar with the jobs related to flying (e.g., pilot, flight attendant) most of the jobs in the aviation industry take place on the ground. In the next part of the lesson, students will explore some of these careers in more detail.

 

 

Action: Playing with Flight Jobs (20-30 min.)

Instructions Teaching Tips

Next, explain that students will be playing a game with cards.

Organize students into groups of 2 to 6. Groups of four are best, but any number would work. The more groups you have, the more sets of cards you will need to print out.

Provide each group with a set of cards from the Career Trading Cards: Aviation Series reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF] [Google folder of individual cards].

Page 1 of Trading cards reproducible
Example page of career trading cards (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).

Note: You may notice that the cards are colour-coded. These codes represent the six Holland Code career personality types. Knowledge of this code is not necessary for this lesson. See more in the Career Education section in Additional Resources.

Line drawing of a computer monitor with a play button

Images and Videos

Text and images on the cards can be described in detail to students who have visual impairments.

Explain the rules of the game using the Career Sets Card Game Rules reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF].

You can also provide student groups with physical or digital copies of the rules.

""
Career Sets Card Game Rules reproducible (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Assessment opporunties icon

Listen to students as they are playing, making note of their use of career terminology. 

Game Variations

  • Reduce the number of cards that are dealt to each player to 4.
  • Reduce the set requirement to 4 cards.
  • Instead of swapping a card, the player receiving a card must lay a card to the discard pile; the person giving the card can take a card from the discard pile or draw pile. If the person giving the card is to the immediate left of the asking player (i.e., will play next) they play as normal after taking a card to replace the one they gave to the player.
  • If the game must end due to time constraints, ensure that each player has had a turn in that round. Any player with a set closest to five (i.e., a set of 4) can lay down and add 10 points to their score. If no player has a set of 4, players with a set of 3 can lay down and add 5 points to their score. If no player has a set of 3, the score remains as it was at the end of the previous round.
Line drawing of a chalkboard with "abc" written on it

Language

Students could use text-to-speech software such as Google Read and Write to listen to the rules out loud.

 

Consolidation: Reflection (10-15 min.)

Instructions Teaching Tips

Lead a class discussion to help students consolidate what they learned by playing the card game.

Assessment opporunties icon

Help students recognize the variety of skills and abilities required for jobs in the aviation industry. Technical and practical skills are usually learned in school, training programs, or on the job. Usually these skills are only used in a specific job. For example, knowing how to use a welding torch is not a skill that is required of a person working in an office setting.

Other important skills are useful, and necessary, for many different jobs (communication, teamwork, problem-solving, speaking/presentation, etc.). These are learned in a variety of settings (in the activities they do in school, in extracurricular activities such as sports and clubs, etc.). While these skills are sometimes referred to as “soft skills”, they are very important to a worker’s success in many jobs and are highly valued by employers.

Line drawing of speech bubbles

Discussions

Discussion prompts can include:

  • “Did any of the sets include skills that surprised you?”
  • “What types of post-secondary education or training was most common? Were the least?”
  • “Were there any skills that seemed more common to the jobs on some cards?”
  • “Which skills do you think are most difficult to learn?”

To document their new learning, provide each student with a copy of the Jobs in Flight 3-3-3 reproducible [Google doc] [Word doc] [PDF] to complete.

""
Jobs in Flight 3-3-3 reproducible. (©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Assessment opporunties icon

Invite students to share their responses either orally or by submitting to you.

line drawing of a lightbulb

Idea

Students could work on the questions independently or in small groups.

Conclude by having students reflect on the jobs they learned about in relation to their own interests and potential career pathways.
Line drawing of speech bubbles

Discussions

Discussion prompts can include:

  • “Which career did you find most interesting? Why?”
  • “Were there any careers that you would definitely not want to do? Why?”

 

Background Information for Teachers

Aviation Industry in Canada

With a country as large as Canada, it is not surprising that the aviation industry plays a very important role. People travel by plane for both work and fun and many goods are brought into and out from Canada by plane. Canada also has many visitors that come to the country by plane.

Shown is a colour photograph of a small plane floating next to a dock.
Some parts of Canada are only accessible by aircraft, such as this floatplane (Source: LynMc42k via iStockphoto).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour photograph of a small plane floating next to a dock.

The plane is bright yellow and teardrop-shaped with a propeller on its nose. It is floating on two long, silver structures attached to the undercarriage. The water below is calm and blue. A wooden dock stretches from the bottom of the image to the floats. 

On the other side of the lake is a low hill covered with thick forest. The sky above is bright blue and clear.

This makes the aviation industry a major contributor to Canada’s economy and labour force. In 2021, the Canadian aerospace (aviation and space) industry contributed over $24B in GDP (Gross Domestic Product) and close to 200,000 jobs to the Canadian economy.

Shown is a colour photograph of a long line of people in a large, open space.
People lined up in Vancouver International Airport, British Columbia (Source: LIVINUS via iStockphoto).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour photograph of a long line of people in a large, open space.

People are standing in single file, with bags and suitcases at their feet. The line zig zags up and down the room, between barriers made from metal posts and blue ribbons. The front of the line is the left-hand wall, where several screens are visible above people's heads. More screens are mounted on the ceiling in the middle of the room. The room is so long that the far end is not visible. More lines of people stretch off into the distance.

Canada’s aerospace industry is known for its skilled workers and for the high-quality products that it produces. Canada specializes in producing regional aircraft, business jets, commercial helicopters and aircraft engines. Canada is also known for its expertise in aircraft maintenance and repair.

This is a growing industry with many career opportunities for youth to consider.

Shown is a colour photograph of four planes on a runway.
Tails of regional jets flown by Air Canada and WestJet (Source: Quintin Soloviev [CC BY-SA 4.0] via Wikimedia Commons).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour photograph of four planes on a runway.

Only the rear half of each plane is visible. They are arranged in a neat row on grey tarmac. Each one is printed with a logo on its tail. 

The closest tail has a read maple leaf on a pattern of blue dots on a pale blue background. The second tail has a white V shape pointing to the back of the plane. This is surrounded by teal and dark blue colours. The last two tails carry the same logos as the first.

A chain link fence runs across the bottom of the image. The rear doors of the first two aircraft are open, and people in reflective vests work nearby. The tarmac is dusted with snow, and the land beyond the runway is completely white. Buildings can be seen all along the horizon in the distance. The sky above is hazy and pale blue.

Additional Resources

Reproducibles

Videos

Careers in Aviation (2019)
See examples of many of the diverse careers in aviation (3:30 min.).

Reproducibles and Media

Reproducibles

Videos

Careers in Aviation (2019)
See examples of many of the diverse careers in aviation (3:30 min.).

Science/Technology

  • Working in pairs or small groups, students could review a selection of cards and classify them as a science, technology, engineering, or math job.
  • Working in teams, choose a career and use the design and build process to design an object that the person in that career might use.

Literacy

  • Using the format listed on the Career Trading Cards, students could interview family members and create a trading card for each person using the information they provide.

Visual Arts

  • Students could create a collage or other visual representation to demonstrate the variety of careers available in the aviation industry.

Career Education

  • Students could select a Career Trading Card of a job that interests them. They could compare and contrast how they themselves are similar and different to the person on the card (or to the skills listed on the card).
  • Students could examine the cards with careers listed in a specific Holland Code category, such as “creator”. What is it about the career that makes it a creative career?

The Holland Code suggests that people, and the work environments they prefer, can be classified into six different groups. These groups are Realistic (doers), Investigative (thinkers), Artistic (creators), Social (helpers), Conventional (organizers), and Enterprising (persuaders). While we all have some interest in, or similarities to, all six groups, most people, and most jobs, are a combination of 2 or 3 main types. The closer our job aligns with our personality type, the happier, and more successful we will be.

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.
Holland code categories ©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.

Each shape is a triangle with one tip cut off. These are joined together with black lines in a hexagon-shaped ring. Each shape is a different colour, with a title in bold letters, a short description, and a line drawing.

Starting at the top and moving clockwise, the first shape is red and titled "Doers." The description reads, "Practical, hands-on, tangible work." The illustration is of a pencil and a ruler.

The second is blue and titled "Thinkers." The description reads, "Research-oriented, knowledgeable, curious." The illustration is a magnifying glass.

The third is orange and titled "Creators." The description reads, "Expressive, creative, visual." The illustration is an illuminated lightbulb.

The fourth is purple and titled "Helpers." The description reads, "Helping, empathetic, friendly." The illustration is two hands, grasping each other.

The fifth is gold and titled "Persuaders." The description reads "Influential, leader, energetic, sociable." The illustration is a stick figure, holding one arm over a large happy face.

The sixth is yellow and titled "Organizers." The description reads, "Structured, organized, careful." The illustration is a notebook and a pencil.

 

Extensions

Science/Technology

  • Working in pairs or small groups, students could review a selection of cards and classify them as a science, technology, engineering, or math job.
  • Working in teams, choose a career and use the design and build process to design an object that the person in that career might use.

Literacy

  • Using the format listed on the Career Trading Cards, students could interview family members and create a trading card for each person using the information they provide.

Visual Arts

  • Students could create a collage or other visual representation to demonstrate the variety of careers available in the aviation industry.

Career Education

  • Students could select a Career Trading Card of a job that interests them. They could compare and contrast how they themselves are similar and different to the person on the card (or to the skills listed on the card).
  • Students could examine the cards with careers listed in a specific Holland Code category, such as “creator”. What is it about the career that makes it a creative career?

The Holland Code suggests that people, and the work environments they prefer, can be classified into six different groups. These groups are Realistic (doers), Investigative (thinkers), Artistic (creators), Social (helpers), Conventional (organizers), and Enterprising (persuaders). While we all have some interest in, or similarities to, all six groups, most people, and most jobs, are a combination of 2 or 3 main types. The closer our job aligns with our personality type, the happier, and more successful we will be.

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.
Holland code categories ©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.

Each shape is a triangle with one tip cut off. These are joined together with black lines in a hexagon-shaped ring. Each shape is a different colour, with a title in bold letters, a short description, and a line drawing.

Starting at the top and moving clockwise, the first shape is red and titled "Doers." The description reads, "Practical, hands-on, tangible work." The illustration is of a pencil and a ruler.

The second is blue and titled "Thinkers." The description reads, "Research-oriented, knowledgeable, curious." The illustration is a magnifying glass.

The third is orange and titled "Creators." The description reads, "Expressive, creative, visual." The illustration is an illuminated lightbulb.

The fourth is purple and titled "Helpers." The description reads, "Helping, empathetic, friendly." The illustration is two hands, grasping each other.

The fifth is gold and titled "Persuaders." The description reads "Influential, leader, energetic, sociable." The illustration is a stick figure, holding one arm over a large happy face.

The sixth is yellow and titled "Organizers." The description reads, "Structured, organized, careful." The illustration is a notebook and a pencil.

 

HOW are you intelligent? An introduction to the Holland Codes (RIASEC) (June 2020)
This article from the Careerproject.org, explains the basics of the Holland Code.

Holland Personality Code
This page from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has more information about the Holland Code, also known as the Holland Personality Code.

Holland’s Personality Types (2018)
This video (5:07 min.) looks at the history, psychology of the code as well as more about each of the six areas.

Learn More

HOW are you intelligent? An introduction to the Holland Codes (RIASEC) (June 2020)
This article from the Careerproject.org, explains the basics of the Holland Code.

Holland Personality Code
This page from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has more information about the Holland Code, also known as the Holland Personality Code.

Holland’s Personality Types (2018)
This video (5:07 min.) looks at the history, psychology of the code as well as more about each of the six areas.

Canadian Council for Aviation & Aerospace (n.d.). Careers in Aviation and Aerospace.

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada, and the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (Summer 2022). State of Canada’s Aerospace Industry Report

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada (May 2, 2022). Aerospace and Defense in Canada.

Transport Canada (Feb. 20, 2020). Careers In Aviation.

U.S. Department of Labor (n.d.). O*NET Interest Profiler.

References

Canadian Council for Aviation & Aerospace (n.d.). Careers in Aviation and Aerospace.

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada, and the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (Summer 2022). State of Canada’s Aerospace Industry Report

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada (May 2, 2022). Aerospace and Defense in Canada.

Transport Canada (Feb. 20, 2020). Careers In Aviation.

U.S. Department of Labor (n.d.). O*NET Interest Profiler.

Reproducibles

Videos

Careers in Aviation (2019)
See examples of many of the diverse careers in aviation (3:30 min.).

Reproducibles and Media

Reproducibles

Videos

Careers in Aviation (2019)
See examples of many of the diverse careers in aviation (3:30 min.).

Science/Technology

  • Working in pairs or small groups, students could review a selection of cards and classify them as a science, technology, engineering, or math job.
  • Working in teams, choose a career and use the design and build process to design an object that the person in that career might use.

Literacy

  • Using the format listed on the Career Trading Cards, students could interview family members and create a trading card for each person using the information they provide.

Visual Arts

  • Students could create a collage or other visual representation to demonstrate the variety of careers available in the aviation industry.

Career Education

  • Students could select a Career Trading Card of a job that interests them. They could compare and contrast how they themselves are similar and different to the person on the card (or to the skills listed on the card).
  • Students could examine the cards with careers listed in a specific Holland Code category, such as “creator”. What is it about the career that makes it a creative career?

The Holland Code suggests that people, and the work environments they prefer, can be classified into six different groups. These groups are Realistic (doers), Investigative (thinkers), Artistic (creators), Social (helpers), Conventional (organizers), and Enterprising (persuaders). While we all have some interest in, or similarities to, all six groups, most people, and most jobs, are a combination of 2 or 3 main types. The closer our job aligns with our personality type, the happier, and more successful we will be.

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.
Holland code categories ©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.

Each shape is a triangle with one tip cut off. These are joined together with black lines in a hexagon-shaped ring. Each shape is a different colour, with a title in bold letters, a short description, and a line drawing.

Starting at the top and moving clockwise, the first shape is red and titled "Doers." The description reads, "Practical, hands-on, tangible work." The illustration is of a pencil and a ruler.

The second is blue and titled "Thinkers." The description reads, "Research-oriented, knowledgeable, curious." The illustration is a magnifying glass.

The third is orange and titled "Creators." The description reads, "Expressive, creative, visual." The illustration is an illuminated lightbulb.

The fourth is purple and titled "Helpers." The description reads, "Helping, empathetic, friendly." The illustration is two hands, grasping each other.

The fifth is gold and titled "Persuaders." The description reads "Influential, leader, energetic, sociable." The illustration is a stick figure, holding one arm over a large happy face.

The sixth is yellow and titled "Organizers." The description reads, "Structured, organized, careful." The illustration is a notebook and a pencil.

 

Extensions

Science/Technology

  • Working in pairs or small groups, students could review a selection of cards and classify them as a science, technology, engineering, or math job.
  • Working in teams, choose a career and use the design and build process to design an object that the person in that career might use.

Literacy

  • Using the format listed on the Career Trading Cards, students could interview family members and create a trading card for each person using the information they provide.

Visual Arts

  • Students could create a collage or other visual representation to demonstrate the variety of careers available in the aviation industry.

Career Education

  • Students could select a Career Trading Card of a job that interests them. They could compare and contrast how they themselves are similar and different to the person on the card (or to the skills listed on the card).
  • Students could examine the cards with careers listed in a specific Holland Code category, such as “creator”. What is it about the career that makes it a creative career?

The Holland Code suggests that people, and the work environments they prefer, can be classified into six different groups. These groups are Realistic (doers), Investigative (thinkers), Artistic (creators), Social (helpers), Conventional (organizers), and Enterprising (persuaders). While we all have some interest in, or similarities to, all six groups, most people, and most jobs, are a combination of 2 or 3 main types. The closer our job aligns with our personality type, the happier, and more successful we will be.

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.
Holland code categories ©2022 Let’s Talk Science).
Image - Text Version

Shown is a colour illustration of six shapes describing Holland code categories.

Each shape is a triangle with one tip cut off. These are joined together with black lines in a hexagon-shaped ring. Each shape is a different colour, with a title in bold letters, a short description, and a line drawing.

Starting at the top and moving clockwise, the first shape is red and titled "Doers." The description reads, "Practical, hands-on, tangible work." The illustration is of a pencil and a ruler.

The second is blue and titled "Thinkers." The description reads, "Research-oriented, knowledgeable, curious." The illustration is a magnifying glass.

The third is orange and titled "Creators." The description reads, "Expressive, creative, visual." The illustration is an illuminated lightbulb.

The fourth is purple and titled "Helpers." The description reads, "Helping, empathetic, friendly." The illustration is two hands, grasping each other.

The fifth is gold and titled "Persuaders." The description reads "Influential, leader, energetic, sociable." The illustration is a stick figure, holding one arm over a large happy face.

The sixth is yellow and titled "Organizers." The description reads, "Structured, organized, careful." The illustration is a notebook and a pencil.

 

HOW are you intelligent? An introduction to the Holland Codes (RIASEC) (June 2020)
This article from the Careerproject.org, explains the basics of the Holland Code.

Holland Personality Code
This page from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has more information about the Holland Code, also known as the Holland Personality Code.

Holland’s Personality Types (2018)
This video (5:07 min.) looks at the history, psychology of the code as well as more about each of the six areas.

Learn More

HOW are you intelligent? An introduction to the Holland Codes (RIASEC) (June 2020)
This article from the Careerproject.org, explains the basics of the Holland Code.

Holland Personality Code
This page from the University of Wisconsin-Madison has more information about the Holland Code, also known as the Holland Personality Code.

Holland’s Personality Types (2018)
This video (5:07 min.) looks at the history, psychology of the code as well as more about each of the six areas.

Canadian Council for Aviation & Aerospace (n.d.). Careers in Aviation and Aerospace.

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada, and the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (Summer 2022). State of Canada’s Aerospace Industry Report

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada (May 2, 2022). Aerospace and Defense in Canada.

Transport Canada (Feb. 20, 2020). Careers In Aviation.

U.S. Department of Labor (n.d.). O*NET Interest Profiler.

References

Canadian Council for Aviation & Aerospace (n.d.). Careers in Aviation and Aerospace.

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada, and the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada (Summer 2022). State of Canada’s Aerospace Industry Report

Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada (May 2, 2022). Aerospace and Defense in Canada.

Transport Canada (Feb. 20, 2020). Careers In Aviation.

U.S. Department of Labor (n.d.). O*NET Interest Profiler.