My STEAM Portfolio Website

Connie Annetta

How does this align with my curriculum?

Students will create a personal website to demonstrate the STEAM skills and concepts they have learned in class/school.

Summary

  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of communications technology terms, and use them correctly in oral and written communication (e.g., layout, site map and navigation)
  • Students will document their skills and learnings in STEAM through the creation of an online portfolio
  • Students will identify and use web creation software to create a simple website using free web builder tools
Specific Expectations for Ontario

Communications Technology, Grade 11 (TGJ3M)
A1. demonstrate an understanding of the core concepts, techniques, and skills required to produce a range of communications media products and services;
A1.4 identify different types of communications software (e.g., page layout, web page creation), and describe how they are used to produce communications technology products and services.
A3.1 demonstrate an understanding of communications technology terms, and use them correctly in oral and written communication
B3. create productions that demonstrate competence in the application of creative and technical skills and incorporate current standards, processes, formats, and technologies.

Communications Technology, Grade 12 (TGJ4M)
A1. demonstrate an understanding of advanced concepts, techniques, and skills required to produce a range of communications media products and services;
B3. create products or productions that demonstrate competence in the application of creative and technical skills and incorporate current and evolving standards, processes, formats, and technologies.

Setting the Stage

 

 

 

STEM literacies are becoming increasingly important to education institutions and industry. So too are skills and abilities developed in other courses. During their time in high school, students amass a huge collection of skills and knowledge through their engagement in various STEM and Arts courses as well as extracurricular activities. Often they are not aware of the importance of these skills.

 

While keeping a journal allows the student to become more mindful of skills that have been acquired as well as those that need to be developed, many students baulk at the process. In this lesson, students will create a website that will allow them to achieve the benefits of journaling without realizing they are, in fact, keeping a journal. This website will also serve as a fully documented portfolio of their skills and learnings that can be shared by postsecondary institutions and prospective employers.

 

Website building illustration
Website building (Source: liravega via iStockphoto).

 

 

 

Materials & Preparation

 

  • Computer or tablet with internet access (1 per student)
  • My STEAM Portfolio Website slideshow [Google slides] [.pptx]
  • My STEAM Portfolio Website Assignment Reproducible (1 per student) [Google doc] [PDF] - provide as a paper or e-copy
  • My STEAM Portfolio Website Rubric Reproducible (1 per student) [Google doc] [PDF] - provide as a paper or e-copy
  • NOTE: students will need to access a free website creation tool such as Wix https://www.wix.com/ or Google Sites https://sites.google.com/.

 

What To Do

 

  • Teachers should ensure students have a good understanding of what STEM/STEAM is and an understanding of the concepts and practices that indicate key digital literacies.
  • Teachers could use the My STEAM Portfolio Website Assignment slideshow and/or reproducible to provide students with an overview of the lesson/assignment. 
  • Teachers could modify the slideshow and provide that copy to students to ensure their website follows expectations.
  • Teachers should share and review the expectations using the Website design rubric.
  • Teachers could complete the lesson as laid out in the following steps as described in the slideshow and below.

 

Part 1: Website Exploration [SLIDE 4]

 

  • [SLIDE 5] Allow students to browse websites and consider these questions:
    • How do you know what the website is about?
    • What are the key areas of the website?
    • How do you feel about the website’s layout and appeal? How would you make it better?
    • How is this website similar to other websites you’ve seen?
  • [SLIDE 6] Review the aspects of a successful website

 

Part 2: Website Setup [SLIDE 7]

 

  • [SLIDE 8] Teachers review the steps for creating the STEAM website.
  • [SLIDE 9] Teachers direct students to create an account on a free website builder such as wix.com or Google slides and document their username and password (if required). 
  • Teachers direct students to select an appropriate template to use for their STEAM portfolios
  • Students are reminded to “Edit” and “Save” their sessions so they don’t lose work. Students are to document the URL on their handout.
  • [SLIDE 10] Teachers direct students to create 6 tabs: Home Page/About Me; Science; Technology; Engineering; Arts; and Math. 
  • [SLIDE 11] Teachers review the requirements for the student websites. For example, the Home page should clearly state the purpose of the website. Students should decorate pages with proper page topic-related images. Students are encouraged to ensure navigation to all pages is easy and clear. Fonts should be consistent. 
  • [SLIDE 12 and 13] Students populate the content of their pages with information and images appropriate to the topic of each page. Pages should be attractive, well-spaced, and properly aligned. Students may refer to the assignment or slideshow for the types of content that would be appropriate.

 

web page design layout illustration
A web page layout (Source: liravega via iStockphoto)

 

 

 

Part 3: Assessment [SLIDE 14] 

 

  • [SLIDE 15] Teachers provide additional tips and hints for student websites including those related to using premade templates and privacy.
  • [SLIDE 16] Teachers review
  • [SLIDE 17] Teachers can share the source of some free icons, such as slidecarnival.com (Creative Commons attribution required) and Google [SLIDE 18].

 

 

 

Elements of a web page illustration
Elements being added to a web page (Source: liravega via iStockphoto).

 

 

 

Part 4: Publish and Share [Slide 19]

 

[Slide 20] After students have completed their website, students should share their work in pairs or groups. The completed webpage should be reviewed and graded according to the teacher's goals.

 

website launch illustration
website launch illustration (Source : liravega via iStockphoto)

 

 

 

  • Teachers could lead a class discussion on the role that such a personal website could play in students’ future career goals. Teachers should ensure the following points are raised and considered:
    • The website is a record of what has been done and achieved.
    • The website is a tool that can be used to acquire future goals such as employment or access to post-secondary.
    • Creating the website helps develop communication skills.
    • The process of adding content helps them learn the content more deeply.
  • Teachers could have students do a gallery walk to demonstrate completed websites.

 

Let’s Talk Science appreciates the work and contributions of Connie Annetta from the Toronto Catholic District School Board in the development of this lesson.

 

Details

Assessment

  • Teachers could use the available rubric to assess and provide feedback of completed websites. The rubric can be customized to meet the needs of the teacher and students.

Assessment

  • Teachers could use the available rubric to assess and provide feedback of completed websites. The rubric can be customized to meet the needs of the teacher and students.

Downloads

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